Leading the way in Nevada and California

I’ve been privileged to be at the helm of Touro University Western Division since January 2014.  The two universities that make up the Western Division are both very vibrant entities that have made significant impacts on their communities.

The students at both locations are very involved and volunteer hundreds of hours of their personal time to provide free health screenings and care under the supervision of dedicated faculty.

We graduate hundreds of new physicians, physician assistants, nurses, occupational therapists, physical therapists and pharmacists each year.  These wonderful graduates are serving the ever increasing health care needs of our communities and across the country.

Our faculty, aside from imparting their deep knowledge to students, are involved in research projects that could lead to new treatments for health issues.  They also spend hours volunteering to provide health care to their neighbors.

Of course, the staff at each university are an integral component in the success of our students and faculty.

I encourage you to learn more about both universities.  Come take a tour.  Learn how you can support these dedicated students and faculty in their mission.

Giving Tuesday

This is a time of peace and giving to our fellow man. To that end, and at the request of our students who have served in our nation’s armed services, Touro University California is restoring its historic Mare Island Hospital flag pole to proudly fly the American flag over our campus once again.

Giving Tuesday, much like Black Friday and Cyber Monday, has emerged as an annual event centered on the Thanksgiving holiday. On Tuesday, December 2nd, charities and individuals around the nation will come together for a common purpose – to celebrate generosity and to give on #GivingTuesday 2014

At Touro, giving back to the community is a fundamental value. Our students regularly staff a free clinic that provides healthcare to the underserved community; provide public health programs into the community; and mentor elementary and high school students.  On Giving Tuesday, Touro University California will turn its attention to the place we call home – Mare Island, a former Naval Shipyard. Every day, our students walk in the footsteps of American military history, attending classes in buildings designated as historic landmarks.  Many of these landmarks are now showing their age.

Our goal is to restore one of these national treasures – the great flagpole at the Mare Island Hospital. Built in 1869, the hospital served tens of thousands of sailors in every world war and conflict until 1996.  When the weary and wounded arrived, they were welcomed by the American flag flying atop a majestic 100-foot steel pole, resembling the mast of the great navy ships.

Please help us restore the great flagpole to its former glory. The rich tradition of raising the Stars and Stripes is a touching experience we want to bring back to Mare Island to honor the great men and women who served here in generations past. I hope you will help us spread the word and consider making a donation by visiting www.tu.edu/givenow. Together we can raise the flag on Mare Island!

I wish you and your family a wonderful Thanksgiving and holiday season!

 

Touro Nursing School Answers National Call to Action

Most people regard nurses as health professionals who care for patients in hospitals. But with the Affordable Care Act bringing 30 million more people into our healthcare system, its success heavily depends on keeping people out of hospitals, or at least from returning to them. That will require more clinical nurses with higher levels of education, skill and management expertise — and fast.

As they retire, baby-boomer nurses are leaving a growing vacuum. Yet, a lack of faculty and resources force nursing schools to turn away thousands of qualified applicants nationally and hundreds in the San Francisco Bay Area. At the same time, hospitals recognize the necessity to employ nurses with baccalaureate or masters degrees able to adapt to a far more complex health care delivery system, as well as a future patient base requiring more sophisticated treatment. According to the Institute of Medicine, Future of Nursing (2011), it is recommended that at least 80 percent of nurses possess baccalaureate or masters degrees by 2020.

The biggest and most obvious need for more highly educated nurses is to improve patient outcomes. Higher demand from the newly insured and tighter restrictions from Medicare, which now penalizes hospitals for readmissions that occur from the same condition, within 30 days of discharge, also contributes to the need for nurses with a higher degree of training.

We, as health care educators, are meeting the challenge. Touro University California is adding a School of Nursing that provides a bridge for ambitious, talented and dedicated nurses to quickly advance their careers to meet the growing demand for nurses with advanced degrees. Touro’s program is designed for working registered nurses, opening career paths to masters degrees in nursing. Touro is one of only 30 nursing schools in the nation offering this kind of program that provides a path from an associates degree to a masters degree in nursing.

The end result – advancing nursing education — will be a life saver, far beyond helping make affordable health care a reality for all.

Our first cohort at the Touro University California School of Nursing starts August 1st. We’ll be preparing a new generation of transformational nurses for the next generation of health care.