Your Guide to the State of Video in Education

Last week I sent out a message focused on specific “resources for creating instructional videos,”  earlier today I received this message in my inbox.  Some of the items I found interesting in the report mentioned below related to students include:

  • Students increasingly expect video to be part of their educational experience.  82% see students’ expectations for how much video should be part of their learning experience as increasing.
  • Video will be a major tool in increasingly personalized learning experiences.  98% of respondents see video as having a part to play in personalized learning experiences.  98% think that interactive videos will be important to education, and anticipate self-paced curriculums.  9% of campuses are already tying video analytics deeply to student behavior and results to predict and bolster student achievement.
  • Educational institutions see a high ROI for video. 91% believe video increases student satisfaction. 82% see it increasing student achievements, and 80% thinks it increases educator collaboration and professional development (80%).
  • Interestingly, the farther along in the educational process an institution is, the more likely they are to see student demand for video increasing.  …while 87% of graduate schools report increasing expectations.
  • 11% of institutions report that more than half their students are actively using video (rather than merely watching it passively).
  • The highest rate of positive feelings, by far, is the ability of video to increase the satisfaction of students with their learning experience, as 91% believed video had a positive impact in this area.

Those interesting items related to faculty include:

  • 80% of faculty… have at least some ability to use simple workflows to publish their work.
  • In terms of support, 84% of faculty get at least a little training…  79% of educators… have at least some access to staff who can help them video production.
  • The most frequently cited [hurdles to creating videos] were: time, money, lack of staff, lack of administrative support, need for easier-to-use tools, lack of awareness of the resources available and the value of video, and rouble making videos accessible.
  • More than half of respondents (52%) report that their institutions are currently recording only up to a quarter of the classes on campus. Only 11% are recording more than half the classes on campus.
  • 38% would like to record more than half the classes on campus, and 18% would like to record more than three quarters.
  • 25% felt lecture capture originated with administrative demand, while 21% saw student demand as a driver.

I have attached a copy of the report below to this message (to save you time from having to download it).

Michael K. Barbour, Ph.D.
Fellow

Attachment: The_State_of_Video_in_Education_2019.pdf


From: Kaltura <Solutions@kaltura.info>
Date: Tuesday, July 9, 2019 at 8:19 AM
Subject: Your Guide to the State of Video in Education

Kaltura
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The State of Video in Education 2019
Email header survey.png
Each year, we ask education professionals around the world how they see video being used both in and out of the classroom. This year, more than 1,400 of you shared your thoughts on how and why your organization uses video, what expectations students and staff have for video technologies, what tools and resources you need, how you approach hot topics such as accessibility and lecture capture, what you see as the future of video in education, and more.
With the mission to power any video experience, Kaltura’s online video platform is deployed globally across thousands of enterprises, media companies, service providers, and educational institutions, leveraging video to teach, learn, collaborate, communicate, and entertain. To learn more visit: www.kaltura.com
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Resources for Creating Instructional Videos

Last week the TUC Provost e-mailed me a copy of an article entitled “Raising the Bar for Academic Video.”  What I found most interesting about this article was that it described the process that one should take when working with an instructional designer to create an instructional video.  However, I would argue that faculty should undertake this process whenever they are creating any instructional video – regardless if it is a five minute screencasting video or a full production video in the green room.  Any time you are creating an instructional video, be sure to think about what you want to achieve with the video; decide if there are ways to cut the topic into multiple, shorter videos; have an outline prepared before you start recording; carefully consider the visuals (e.g., slides, the screen, whether you’ll have a video of yourself included in the video, etc.); don’t just record the video, but be sure to do some editing too; and make sure to upload it into Kaltura instead of as a file in Canvas.

I actually received the article the day before I noticed that Valencia College Faculty and Instructional Development had posted this series of videos:

  • Kaltura Capture Overview – a video that outlines how to access Kaltura inside of Canvas in order to create instructional videos, how to download the new Kaltura Capture client, how to create a screencast using Kaltura Capture, and how to upload a video to Kaltura inside of Canvas
    • note that I created an instructional video that just shows just how to upload an existing video to Kaltura inside of Canvas at https://youtu.be/PJfV_viRZk4
  • Requesting Captions in Kaltura – a video that outlines how to request any video uploaded toKaltura inside of Canvas is closed captioned
  • Editing Captions in Kaltura – a video that outlines how to edit the closed captioning that you receive from Kaltura inside of Canvas

Now one of the good things about Kaltura is that videos that uploaded to Kaltura inside of Canvas do not count against the Canvas file size quota. Another nice thing is that if you do take the time to request the captions from Kaltura, the company claims that their captioning meets the requirements of both Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).

By the way, I should have stated up front that Valencia College Faculty and Instructional Development has some great Canvas instructional videos in general.

As always, if you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me.

Michael K. Barbour, Ph.D.
Fellow

Final Blackboard Reminder

A quick reminder to everyone that our contract with Blackboard ends at midnight Eastern on Sunday, 30 June 2019.

While the IT team at TCUS has archived all of the courses and organizations that contain student data for compliance reasons, I must once again remind faculty and staff that you do not have access to these archives.

IF YOU WANT TO HAVE ACCESS TO ANY CONTENT THAT IS CURRENTLY STORED IN BLACKBOARD, YOU MUST EXPORT THAT CONTENT YOURSELF AND SAVE IT ON YOUR COMPUTER OR IN BOX.

If you are unfamiliar with how to do this, please follow the steps outlined in the video at:

https://youtu.be/YFRCAQfe7G4

If you have any questions, please let Jim O’Connor or myself know.

Michael K. Barbour
Fellow

Reminder – Final Notification: Faculty Opportunity for 2019-20 : ACUE Course – Effective Teaching in Higher Education

Dear Colleagues,

This is final notification. All applications are due by next Wednesday, June 19th.

Once again, Touro University California and Touro University Nevada will offer an online course for interested faculty focused on Effective Teaching in Higher Education in collaboration
with the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE).

We just had over 30 faculty members complete the course during this academic year, and they overwhelmingly thought the course was transformative for their teaching.

The course is offered via Canvas. There will be three face-to-face meetings. The first face-to-face meeting in August will kick off the course and will be approximately 4 hours
in length. The other two face-to-face meetings will occur between blocks 1 and 2, and 2 and 3, and will be approximately 2 hours in length.

>From discussions with those who just finished the course, the amount of time commitment is 3-4 hours per unit.

Our plan is to admit 10 faculty members from TUN and 20 from TUC (the opposite of what we did this year). From TUC, we would like approximately the same number
from each of the three colleges.

I have attached the 2018-19 schedule. The 2019-20 schedule will be similar, but not identical. The schedule allows you to see the topics, as well as get a sense of the pace of the
course.

Those individuals completing the course will receive a certificate in Effective Teaching in Higher Education as well as a pin.

Also attached is an application form.

If you are interested, PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION FORM AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

IMPORTANT: THE FIRST FACE-TO-FACE CLASS IN CALIFORNIA WILL BE ON THURSDAY MORNING AUGUST 1st FROM 9-12, IN NEVADA IT WILL BE FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2ND FROM 9-12. THESE ARE REQUIRED MEETINGS.

All applications will be vetted with your college dean.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Best wishes,

Jim O’Connor Ph.D.
Director

Attachments:

Artificial Intelligence and Health Care

Dear Colleagues,

Forbes Magazine presents an interesting overview on the future effects of Artificial Intelligence on Health Care.

“Based on the system-level shifts technology brought to other industries, we are entering the window in time where the landscape of health will start to be redefined.  This transformation will encompass sweeping changes in the pools of data we rely on; in the functional building blocks of the “work” of healthcare, such as doctors, hospitals, and emergency rooms; and in the economic undercurrents and data streams that will reset how the marketplace rewards value.”

“Technology Alone Won’t Save Healthcare, But It Will Redefine It”

Below is the link:

https://www.forbes.com/sites/insights-intelai/2019/02/11/technology-alone-wont-save-healthcare-but-it-will-redefine-it/#51bf38c94269

Comments?

Jim O’Connor Ph.D.
Director 

Final Notification: Faculty Opportunity for 2019-20 : ACUE Course – Effective Teaching in Higher Education

Dear Colleagues,

This is a third and final notification.

Once again, Touro University California and Touro University Nevada will offer an online course for interested faculty focused on Effective Teaching in Higher Education in collaboration with the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE).

We just had over 30 faculty members complete the course during this academic year, and they overwhelmingly thought the course was transformative for their teaching.

The course is offered via Canvas. There will be three face-to-face meetings. The first face-to-face meeting in August will kick off the course and will be approximately 4 hours in length. The other two face-to-face meetings will occur between blocks 1 and 2, and 2 and 3, and will be approximately 2 hours in length.

From discussions with those who just finished the course, the amount of time commitment is 3-4 hours per unit.

Our plan is to admit 10 faculty members from TUN and 20 from TUC (the opposite of what we did this year). From TUC, we would like approximately the same number from each of the three colleges.

I have attached the 2018-19 schedule. The 2019-20 schedule will be similar, but not identical. The schedule allows you to see the topics, as well as get a sense of the pace of the course.

Those individuals completing the course will receive a certificate in Effective Teaching in Higher Education as well as a pin.

Also attached is an application form.

If you are interested, PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION FORM AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. The deadline is June 20th.

IMPORTANT: THE FIRST FACE-TO-FACE CLASS IN CALIFORNIA WILL BE ON THURSDAY MORNING AUGUST 1st FROM 9-12, IN NEVADA IT WILL BE FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 2ND FROM 9-12. THESE ARE REQUIRED MEETINGS.

All applications will be vetted with your college dean.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Best wishes,

Jim O’Connor Ph.D.
Director

Attachments:

Rewarding… Reflections on Completing “Designing Online Courses for Accessibility”

You know that feeling when you complete something and reflect on how rewarding it was?

Well I just finished the online canvas course titled, “Designing Online Courses for Accessibility.” I really liked it.  I took about 4 hours total to complete and taught me so much.  I loved how it was presented and the content was understandable for a topic I did not know much about.

The course looks at strategies to make online content to be both Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) compliant.  Note that this does not just apply to online, hybrid, and/or blended courses.  Under federal law ALL online content that is posted in a learning management system – like Canvas – should be compliant with both ADA and 504.

If you get a chance this summer please take this course.  Debbie Millican did an amazing job and if nothing else this provided me a wonderful template on how to use Canvas to deliver a course.  Debbie is the Instructional Designer for the College of Health and Human Services Touro University, Nevada.  The course is free and self-paced online.  Enjoy…

Rolly Kali-Rai
College of Pharmacy
Touro University California

The Priceless Tools offered by Effective Teaching in Higher Education Course (ACUE Course): CILT – By Amina Sadik

Dear Colleagues,

For those of you considering taking the ACUE Course in Effective Teaching in Higher Education, below is a blog written by
Amina Sadik, Professor of Basic Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Touro University Nevada.

Jim O’Connor Ph.D.
Director


The Priceless Tools offered by Effective Teaching in Higher Education Course

When I found the second notification from Dr. O’Connor about the online course on Effective Teaching in Higher Education in collaboration with the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE), I felt that I must share my enthusiasm about this course in order to encourage my colleagues to find time in their busy schedule to complete it. 
You would think that after 30 years of teaching, half of which in a medical school, I would feel that I have nothing more to learn about teaching. Far from it!
I am one of those people who think that there is always something to learn. I have mastered, and used successfully, several teaching methodologies, especially active learning strategies, and I have shared a few of them in my weekly posts and reflections during the last academic year. However, I learned several teaching strategies and teaching techniques that I have already applied and others that I plan to during this coming semester. One of my favorite modules is 2E, which was about supporting unprepared students.  Some of the techniques taught I was already practicing, however, not as effectively as I could, as I learned from the course. Those amongst us who honor the open-door policy know that unprepared students need our support outside the classroom to be successful. Nonetheless, the strategies taught in Effective Teaching in Higher Education regarding classroom and outside class practices that support student success are so enlightening, you will wish you knew about th!
 em when you first started teaching.
I think that any faculty member who cares about student learning will learn priceless lessons from the grading practices that support student success. Some of these practices reminded me of what I have learned from the famous course offered by the world-renowned medical educator and pioneer of OSCE, Dr. Harden: “Essential Skills of Medical Education”. 
One of the strengths of the Effective Teaching in Higher Education is the resources provided at the end of each module, so that one can delve into and learn even more about the topic at hand. These resources are not only articles and books but also video and blogs by those who are in the trenches of education. One of my favorites is a book Dr. McGuire, “Teach Students How to Learn,” that I purchased before the end of module 2E. It is money well spent! The other book I bought because of this course is “make it stick, The Science of Successful Learning”.
The second most important block was about Designing Courses. I know I have I designed successful courses, and yet I learned from the modules in this block as well. I cannot talk about them all. However, I must mention at least three of them here, because I was able to apply them before the end of the spring semester and was pleased to see my students reap the benefits of my newly acquired insight: “Establishing Powerful Learning”, “Aligning Assessments with Course” and “Aligning Activities and Assignments”. I used my GI lectures to apply what I was learning through this block. It was very hard, but it was so fulfilling.
If you can imagine a world where your students learn better from you, where you have the ability to evaluate and improve your assessment practices, and where you are able to write clear learning outcomes and where you are able to prepare your own effective syllabus, you should take this course without hesitation.
I end this post with a quote by Dr. Bowen when he was asked about teaching: “The magic is passion”. I am sure that you have it in you.

Amina Sadik

2nd Notification: Faculty Opportunity for 2019-20: ACUE Course – Effective Teaching in Higher Education

Dear Colleagues,

This is a second notification.

Once again, Touro University California and Touro University Nevada will offer an online course for interested faculty focused on Effective Teaching in Higher Education in collaboration
with the Association of College and University Educators (ACUE).

We just had over 30 faculty members complete the course during this academic year, and they overwhelmingly thought the course was transformative for their teaching.

The course is offered via Canvas. There will be three face-to-face meetings. The first face-to-face meeting in August will kick off the course and will be approximately 4 hours
in length. The other two face-to-face meetings will occur between blocks 1 and 2, and 2 and 3, and will be approximately 2 hours in length.

>From discussions with those who just finished the course, the amount of time commitment is 3-4 hours per unit.

Our plan is to admit 10 faculty members from TUN and 20 from TUC (the opposite of what we did this year). From TUC, we would like approximately the same number
from each of the three colleges.

I have attached the 2018-19 schedule. The 2019-20 schedule will be similar, but not identical. The schedule allows you to see the topics, as well as get a sense of the pace of the
course.

Those individuals completing the course will receive a certificate in Effective Teaching in Higher Education as well as a pin.

Also attached is an application form.

If you are interested, PLEASE COMPLETE THE APPLICATION FORM AS SOON AS POSSIBLE.

All applications will be vetted with your college dean.

Please let me know if you have any questions or concerns.

Best wishes,

Jim O’Connor Ph.D.
Director

Attachments:

Suggestions for holding class discussions

Dear Colleagues,

Here is a recent article from the Chronicle of Higher Education focusing on effective classroom discussions:

https://www.chronicle.com/interactives/20190523-ClassDiscussion

Comments?

Jim O’Connor, Ph.D.
Director